PROC REPORT, the Right Tool for the Job

PROC REPORT, the Right Tool for the Job

‘PROC REPORT, the Right Tool for the Job’ is a tutorial I gave by Request to the Hawaii SAS users group in 2006. It is proc report in a very compressed nutshell. It is really surprising just how much of Proc Report’s power can be revealed in a couple of hours. If you want a jumpstart on Proc Report, start with these examples! I even through in some tagset modifications for some really nice effects. [paper] Hawaii SAS Users group, 2006. This was a tutorial given especially for the Hawaii SAS user group’s  SAS day. It was really a tutorial and was almost two hours in length.  The examples progressed very logically and slowly revealed what you need to know to start using Proc Report to create amazing reports. Proc Report is amazingly versatile and powerful. Learn how to use it and your reporting life will be much easier. [/paper] ‘PROC REPORT, the Right Tool for the Job’  Covers a lot of ground.  Everything you need to know for basic reporting and then some. Compute blocks, computed columns, column aliases, analysis columns, noprint, style over rides, even computed urls for drill down reports. Then on top of it all using the slider and survey tagsets to create some really nice tables.  You may want to change the colors in the stylesheet from green, yellow and red to something else!  The slides are fairly straight forward, get the example code from my repository for the full story. Everything is available in my GitHub repositories. This paper as with all of my SAS papers is a available from my SAS-Papers github repository.   The example code for this paper can be found in my SAS-Examples github...

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The Beginner’s Guide to ODS MARKUP: Don’t Panic!

The Beginner’s Guide to ODS MARKUP: Don’t Panic!

“The Beginners Guide to ODS Markup: Don’t Panic!” is all about finding your way around with ODS Markup and Tagsets. I took a hint from ‘The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy’ and wrote ‘Don’t panic’ on the front in nice friendly letters.

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SAS Reports of your dreams

SAS Reports of your dreams

‘The SAS reports you’ve always dreamed of’  came about because of all the people I helped and worked with. This paper is about common problems, great solutions, and the beautiful reports people were creating.

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ODS Tagset Spelunking and Cartography

ODS Tagset Spelunking and Cartography

‘ODS Tagset Spelunking and Cartography’ came about because I was always getting phone calls and emails from people just wanting to understand how tagsets worked so they could modify them and use them. The event driven model that tagsets used wasn’t easily accessible by many people. This paper was an attempt to shed some light on just how tagsets worked, and how to debug, modify, and otherwise bend them to your will.

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ODS Markup: The Power of Choice and Change

ODS Markup: The Power of Choice and Change

This was the first paper I ever wrote about ODS Tagsets. Tagsets were the beginning of something new– Open-source SAS output destinations. For the first time, SAS customers could change anything and everything about the HTML, CSV, LaTeX or troff that SAS generated. Tagsets opened the door for special transport formats, which in turn, help integrate SAS into other systems, including anything from a special HTML format to a custom XML needed for intra company data transfers. The Tagset programs that now defined many of the ODS output types can easily be updated, modified, and shared between anyone that wanted to. Tagsets also broke the dependency of these output destinations from the SAS development cycle, allowing updates and even new ODS destinations to be developed and released between the major software releases. ABSTRACT: When it comes to markup languages, there are lots of choices. If you are keeping up with the web, you might say XML is your choice. XML alone is full of choices. But XML is just the latest craze. There are lots of other markup languages out there. Using the ODS MARKUP output destination the ability to create these types of output are within your grasp. This was the first paper I ever wrote about ODS Tagsets. Tagsets were the beginning of something new. Open source SAS output destinations. For the first time SAS customers could change anything and everything about the HTML, CSV, LaTeX or troff that SAS generated. Tagsets opened the door for special transport formats, which in turn help integrate SAS into other systems.  Anything from a special HTML format to a custom XML needed for intra company data transfers. The Tagset programs that now defined many of the ODS output types can easily be updated, modified and shared between anyone that wanted to. Tagsets also broke the dependency of these output destinations from the SAS development cycle allowing updates and even new ODS destinations to be developed and released between the major software releases. As an introduction to Tagsets this paper was all about explaining how they worked and giving examples of things that could be done in order to spur everyone’s imagination.  This became a recurring theme in many of my papers.  I was continually helping people do various things with ODS tagsets, and that would spawn new ideas which ultimately went into ODS development or at the very least into some crazy example in a paper. At the time, ODS HTML output was something everyone lived with. It wasn’t offensive, but it wasn’t pretty either.  The worst part was that changes were bound to the SAS release cycle of every 2-3 years. This was just not quick enough to keep up with the quickly changing internet landscape. Tagsets changed all of that by allowing anyone to customize what ODS generated as output.  For me, that meant I didn’t have to come up with compromises for what everyone wanted in their output. I also hoped that this would mean I could spend more time on other projects instead of working so much on creating HTML.  Boy was I wrong. Tagsets did free me from my very specific work on ODS HTML, CSV, LaTeX etc.  But I ended up working even more on new tagsets for new destinations, and helping lots of...

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