Presentations

I have taught many classes and given many presentations over the years. I'm known for being an entertaining speaker, even when presenting dry geeky subjects. My presentations often encorporate varied metaphors and stories to get a point across.

The slides to my presentations do not always give the whole story.  For instance, my presentation on ODS packages/zip files was presented as a primer on learning Argentine tango.

My presentation on inline formatting used the poem 'Jabberwocky' in such a way that it was translated through the presentation revealing that not everything is as it might at first seem.

My presentations generally adapt to the locale, the audience, current events, and topics.  I have given many successful presentations, including keynotes, with no slides and minimal preparation, so that I can truly engage with the audience and present ideas in dynamic ways.

ODS Markup: The Power of Choice and Change

Posted by on Mar 23, 2013 in ODS, Presentations, SAS, Tagsets | 0 comments

ODS Markup: The Power of Choice and Change

This was the first paper I ever wrote about ODS Tagsets. Tagsets were the beginning of something new– Open-source SAS output destinations. For the first time, SAS customers could change anything and everything about the HTML, CSV, LaTeX or troff that SAS generated. Tagsets opened the door for special transport formats, which in turn, help integrate SAS into other systems, including anything from a special HTML format to a custom XML needed for intra company data transfers. The Tagset programs that now defined many of the ODS output types can easily be updated, modified, and shared between anyone that wanted to. Tagsets also broke the dependency of these output destinations from the SAS development cycle, allowing updates and even new ODS destinations to be developed and released between the major software releases. ABSTRACT: When it comes to markup languages, there are lots of choices. If you are keeping up with the web, you might say XML is your choice. XML alone is full of choices. But XML is just the latest craze. There are lots of other markup languages out there. Using the ODS MARKUP output destination the ability to create these types of output are within your grasp. This was the first paper I ever wrote about ODS Tagsets. Tagsets were the beginning of something new. Open source SAS output destinations. For the first time SAS customers could change anything and everything about the HTML, CSV, LaTeX or troff that SAS generated. Tagsets opened the door for special transport formats, which in turn help integrate SAS into other systems.  Anything from a special HTML format to a custom XML needed for intra company data transfers. The Tagset programs that now defined many of the ODS output types can easily be updated, modified and shared between anyone that wanted to. Tagsets also broke the dependency of these output destinations from the SAS development cycle allowing updates and even new ODS destinations to be developed and released between the major software releases. As an introduction to Tagsets this paper was all about explaining how they worked and giving examples of things that could be done in order to spur everyone’s imagination.  This became a recurring theme in many of my papers.  I was continually helping people do various things with ODS tagsets, and that would spawn new ideas which ultimately went into ODS development or at the very least into some crazy example in a paper. At the time, ODS HTML output was something everyone lived with. It wasn’t offensive, but it wasn’t pretty either.  The worst part was that changes were bound to the SAS release cycle of every 2-3 years. This was just not quick enough to keep up with the quickly changing internet landscape. Tagsets changed all of that by allowing anyone to customize what ODS generated as output.  For me, that meant I didn’t have to come up with compromises for what everyone wanted in their output. I also hoped that this would mean I could spend more time on other projects instead of working so much on creating HTML.  Boy was I wrong. Tagsets did free me from my very specific work on ODS HTML, CSV, LaTeX etc.  But I ended up working even more on new tagsets for new destinations, and helping lots of...

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